Noticeboard

Please note that our telephone system was replaced on 15th June 2022.  Our new number is 01254 45 75 95


 


Our prescription line has returned to the pre-COVID service and will be reserved for housebound patients only between 10am and 12 noon Monday to Friday.


All other prescription requests should be made via the patient apps, email, website prescription page or post your slip through our letterbox.


If you or any household member are awaiting COVID-19 test results or have symptoms please contact us and rearrange your appointment.


Please ensure you bring a face covering (to cover both your nose and mouth) if you are asked to attend by the GP or nurse. 


# wash your hands regularly


YOU must let us know if you have any symptoms suggestive of coronavirus.


If you do not tell us or attempt to hide symptoms from us we are ALL at risk of becoming unwell.


How to Access appointments -  Please call the surgery of use any of the patient access apps. 


Some appointments will still require telephone triage. We still need to be vigilant and help to stop the spread of Coronavirus.


Your practice is open for you and if you need to see a GP please ring us on 01254 287150 between 8am and 6.30pm.


Use of antibiotics

Antibiotics are important medicines to help treat infections that are caused by bacteria. Different antibiotics are used to kill different types of bacteria. They can be used to treat relatively mild conditions such as acne as well as potentially life-threatening conditions such as pneumonia (a type of lung infection). Antibiotics are usually taken by mouth, but can sometimes be given into a vein (intravenous), into a muscle (intramuscular) or applied to the skin (topical).

Why might the GP not prescribe antibiotics?

At the Clayton Medical Centre we will only prescribe antibiotics if we feel that they will benefit your condition - many conditions will improve without the need for medication. The majority of common ailments such as colds, most coughs and sore throats are caused by viruses. Antibiotics do not work against infections caused by viruses and generally these will get better on their own.

Antibiotic resistance (when an antibiotic is no longer effective) is a major problem. This is caused by overusing and inappropriately prescribing antibiotics. The resistance of bacteria to antibiotics has led to the emergence of superbugs such as meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Clostridium difficile (C. diff) which are often in the headlines.

Some antibiotics are not suitable for people with certain medical conditions, or for women who are pregnant or breastfeeding. You should only ever take antibiotics that are prescribed to you – never 'borrow' them from a friend of family member. You are also be prescribed certain antibiotics if you are known to have had an allergic reaction in the past. This is estimated to affect about 1 in 15 people in the UK.

What can I do to help combat antibiotic resistance?

There are a number of things that you can do to help manage antibiotic resistance.

Don't expect to be prescribed antibiotics when you are unwell, particularly if your GP believes your illness is caused by a virus.

Ÿ If you are prescribed antibiotics please make sure you take the complete course in order to get rid of the bacteria completely. If you have tablets left over or 'save some for next time' some bacteria may be left to develop resistance.

Ÿ Treat viral infections such as colds by drinking plenty of fluids and resting. Seek advice from your pharmacist to help manage your condition. If your cold lasts for more than three weeks you should consider seeing you GP.

By not using them unnecessarily, they're more likely to work when we do need them.It is important to read the information leaflet that comes with your medication carefully in order to get most benefit and avoid side effects.

Where can I find more information about antibiotics?

You can find lots more useful information about antibiotics on the NHS Choices website including, what they are used for, side effects and more details about antibiotic resistance. You can also watch a short video about antibiotics. If you would like more information about how to get well without antibiotics your can download a leaflet here.

 

 

 

 
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